Books Become Landscapes

I’ve been captivated by the carved and sandblasted book landscapes of Guy Laremee for several days now. Taking a book and transforming it into a three dimensional canvas is brilliant, and his execution is impressive and haunting.

Via Colossal and Cool Hunting:

Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

New Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee sculpture paper books

Artist Guy Laramee (previously) has recently completed a number of new sculptural works where he transforms thick tomes into incredible topographical features including mountains, caves, volcanoes, and even water. Many of the works are part of a new project titled Guan Yin, a series of work dedicated to the forces that enable individuals to endure grief and pain, or in his words “the mysterious forces thanks to which we can traverse ordeals.” If you happen to be near Quebec, a number of Laramee’s works are currently on view at Expression gallery in Saint-Hyacinthe through August 12.

Via Cool Hunting:

What inspired the ideas for your book sculptures and what is the process that is involved in creating them?

The bookwork came in the alignment of three things: a casual discovery, my undertaking of an MA in anthropology and the building of La Grande Bibliothèque du Québec. The undertaking of this grand library fascinated me because at that time (2000) I thought that the myth of the encyclopedia—having all of humanity’s knowledge at the same place—was long dead. I was, myself, going back to school to make sense of 15 years of professional practice and was, once more, confronted with my love/hate relationship with words. Then came this accident, so to speak. I was working in a metal shop, having received a commission for a theater set. In a corner of the shop was a sandblaster cabinet. Suddenly, I had the stupid idea of putting a book in there. And that was it. Within seconds, the whole project unfolded.

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