Australia’s Shark Bay From Above

Australia's Shark Bay

A gorgeous lagoon in Shark Bay

Shark Bay covers some 5.4 million acres on the western coast of Australia, but it’s often overlooked, despite having some of the most breathtaking scenery in the world. With bright red sands, ancient stromatolites, and turquoise waters, it’s certainly a memorable destination. British photographer Tommy Clarke became fascinated with Shark Bay after exploring the beaches on foot. Curious what it’d look like from above, he chartered helicopters to get an aerial glimpse, and the scene did not disappoint. Intense color contrasts and forms create a stunning visual backdrop, one that is full of life, and history. Strange stromatolite formations formed over millions of years create a one-of-a-kind addition to this UNESCO World Heritage Site, a place home to over 10,000 dugongs, or sea cows, over 300 species of fish, and the world’s largest known area of seagrass. All in all, a strange and beautiful spot, unlike anything else on our fragile planet. Via Wired:

Australia's Shark Bay

The road to Monkey Mia, a tourist spot within Shark Bay

Australia's Shark Bay

Smooth red sand dunes pour into the green waters of Shark Bay

Australia's Shark Bay

Brilliant color shifts of Shark Bay from above

Australia's Shark Bay

Underwater sandbanks and seagrass

Australia's Shark Bay

tributaries and rivers flow organically

Australia's Shark Bay

Beautiful contrasts of Shark Bay from above

Australia's Shark Bay

Winding rivers with ice blue waters

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