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Posts from the ‘Animals’ category

Destroying Nature is Destroying Life

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A gorgeous and powerful campaign for environmental group Robin Wood features brilliantly rendered scenes of habitat destruction, superimposed in the form of the creatures they’re hurting.  The agency Grabarz & Partner created the posters using painstakingly rendered 3D forms, and adding in details like oil rigs, fires, and industrial machinery. Their tagline: Destroying nature is destroying life. The result is a painfully effective look at what happens to the natural world when humans act with indifference and greed toward nature. Beautiful and sad work, Via Behance:

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The Blue Forest

Bluebells completely cover the ground cover in this lovely forest in Belgium. The Hallerbos Forest, to be precise. Photographer Kilian Schönberger has a beautiful collection of images from this peaceful, lovely place. Great lighting and framing give these photos a fantasy-like feel.  A definition of purity and calm via Behance:

Illusions Star in this Pet Adoption Campaign

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Visual illusions are always fun, especially when they are for a good cause. The World For All Animal Care And Adoptions in Mumbai have a very clever set of posters that encourage people to adopt pets, using very carefully positioned photos of people. Look closely….. See the silhouettes? Artists Amol Jadhav and Pranav Bhide did a great job pulling off this classy and eye opening campaign. Via Petapixel:

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Coachella’s Colorful Creatures

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Coachella has become a major destination, a music festival that is eclipsing all others. This year the festival has teamed up with artists Joanne Tatham and Tom O’Sullivan to create giant, colorful beasts that roam the grounds. The brightly painted monsters are gentle in demeanor, and have already been backdrop to countless selfies and concertgoer photos. In addition to the giant boxy beasts, Coachella’s art includes crazy house-like structures that involve psychedelic projection-mapping. Lots more to see on DesignBoom:

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Visual Mashup Music Video

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An exercise in video editing patience. And creativity. The latest music video from Cassius featuring Pharell and Cat Power is a visual feast of funny, sexy, strange and beautiful footage mashups. Utilizing split screen style with quick cuts and visual collages, the video contains hundreds of clips that should get your creativity flowing.


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Interactive and Immersive Dinner Table

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Projection mapping, the art and science of precise projected artwork, is coming into it’s own. Take the newly opened Sagaya restaurant in the Ginza neighborhood of Tokyo. It’s diners are greeted to a table that reacts to the plates set on it, so each course is a new and beautiful experience. Butterflies flit and fly around a plate of delicate vegetables. Leave your hand still on the tabletop, and a digital bird may land on it, just to take flight when you move it.  Created by art collective Teamlab, the restaurant looks delicious and an experience not to miss. Via DesignBoom:

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Endangered Tropical Fish in Bold Color

It’s no secret that our oceans are in trouble. With the collapsing Great Barrier Reef, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and decades of pollution and overfishing, it’s a wonder that the oceans are alive at all. We MUST as a species start caring for our planet, if we want it to continue providing for us. In a collaboration for the Endangered Wildlife Project, Matt W. Moore has a series of brightly illustrated tropical fish, all of which are endangered.

The beautifully clean and colorful illustrations should capture our collective attention, so we can start thinking about earth’s creatures in a more protective light. Via Behance:

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National Parks 2050

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In a grim yet horrifyingly accurate portrayal, artist Hannah Rothstein beautifully creates dystopian future versions of classic National Park posters. The designs for the 2050 versions are set next to their classic counterpoints, showing the devastation that very well may occur unless we start waking up to the realities of climate change. And our very horrible president isn’t going to be doing any favors to our parks, in that regard.  Rothstein is selling her work in poster form, with 25% of profits going to climate related causes.

From the artist’s website:

“Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” -Aldous Huxley

National Parks 2050 is a call to action. Drawing upon the classic National Parks posters, this series shows how climate change will affect seven of America’s most beloved landscapes. In doing so, it makes climate change feel close to home and hard to ignore.

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Two Thirds of the Great Barrier Reef Now Bleached

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Considered one of the true treasures of Planet Earth, the Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral system on the planet, able to be seen from space. And now, due to human caused climate change, it’s been severely, severely damaged, possibly forever. Coral bleaching, caused by high water temperatures, has been happening on the reef for the last several years. But a severely hot summer there this year has increased the bleaching to reach two thirds of the entire reef system. This means bright, colorful, living coral has now been killed, leaving white skeletons of the coral behind. The chart below show the amount of bleaching from 2016 to 2017. Sadly, the trend is not going in the right direction. Via James Cook University:

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With such a huge area of bleaching, what can be done to stem the tide? Well, cutting emissions is the first critical step. And judging by current politics, that seems uncertain. For reference, a healthy, beautiful section of the Great Barrier Reef looks like the below photo:

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London’s Garden Bridge Too Expensive to be Built?

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Thomas Heatherwick’s studio had a fantastic plan for a pedestrian garden bridge over the River Thames in London. For years, it was going through approvals and funding complications, but seemed destined to be built. Indeed, over £45 million has already been spent on the preparation for the project. Recently, however, the city of London has balked at the idea of a non-vehicle bridge being built at a cost of £200 million.  It’s a shame, since the design is stunning, and it would be a beautifully green contrast to London’s recent skyscraper binge.  The idea was simple:  to connect north and south London with a garden. Now that it’s future is in jeopardy, what might replace it? Let’s hope for something good. Via Dezeen:

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