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Posts from the ‘Art/Design’ category

Cycle of Decay: A Sculpted Ceramic Hand that Looks Like a Carved Tree Branch wood sculpture ceramic anatomy

Cycle of Decay: A Sculpted Ceramic Hand that Looks Like a Carved Tree Branch wood sculpture ceramic anatomy

Cycle of Decay: A Sculpted Ceramic Hand that Looks Like a Carved Tree Branch wood sculpture ceramic anatomy

Cycle of Decay: A Sculpted Ceramic Hand that Looks Like a Carved Tree Branch wood sculpture ceramic anatomy

Cycle of Decay: A Sculpted Ceramic Hand that Looks Like a Carved Tree Branch wood sculpture ceramic anatomy

Amazing ceramic sculpture by Christopher David White.

This impeccably detailed ceramic sculpture called Cycles of Decay was created by ceramicist Christopher David White who works out of Bloomington, Indiana. Even on close inspection the knotted and twisting veins of the tree branch look almost exactly like old wood, take a closer look on his website. (via sweet station)

The artist has another impressive sculpture with the title Not 2B, similarly detailed and realistic.

Not2B-0

Not2B-3

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Hüseyin Sahin

Turkish artist Hüseyin Sahin has a vivid imagination, judging by these digital collages he dreamed up. He shows a beautiful use of lighting and blending. It’s great to see this type of surrealist creativity, it often jars loose some unique ideas of our own. Via Colossal and Behance:

Hüseyin Sahin Hüseyin Sahin Hüseyin Sahin Hüseyin SahinHüseyin Sahin

Hüseyin Sahin

Hüseyin Sahin

feral children of the world

Sujit Kumar (the chicken boy), Fiji, 1978
Kept in a chicken coop by his family until the age of 8, Sujit Kumar clucked, pecked at food, and roosted like a bird

The stories behind the photographs aren’t pretty. They’re weird, terrifying, and often disturbing. But photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten does a great job creating beautifully lit scenes to pay homage to these strange stories. Like Sujit Jumar, trapped in a chicken coop for so long, he pecked like a chicken and ‘roosted’ at night. Descriptions and images via DesignBoom:

feral children of the world

Lobo wolf girl, Mexico, 1845/1852
Seen in Mexico running on all fours with a pack of wolves, attacking a herd of goats

feral children of the world

Prava (the bird boy), Russia, 2008
confined to a room containing dozens of his mother’s pet birds, Prava could not speak when found, only chirp

feral children of the world

Kamala and Amala, India, 1920
aged 8 and 1 respectively, the pair were found living in a cave with wolves
running on all fours, the pair were physically deformed and had exceptional hearing, sight and sense of smell

feral children of the world

Rochom P’ngien (jungle girl), Cambodia, 2007
Rochom was caught at the age of 27 having been missing for 19 years. She walked on all fours and could not speak

feral children of the world

Madina, Russia, 2013
Lived with dogs until the age of three; when found she walked on all fours and growled

feral children of the world

Oxana Malaya, Ukraine, 1991
Lived with dogs in a kennel for 6 years, when found she panted, bared her teeth, ran on all fours and barked

feral children of the world

John Ssebunya (the monkey boy), 1991
living with monkeys for 3 years, John survived until the age of 6 on roots and nuts before he was found

feral children of the world

Ivan Mishukov, Russia, 1998
After running away at the age of four, Ivan lived for two years with a pack of dogs. He now leads a normal life

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The Big Bend probably won’t be built. At 3,690 feet long, the skyscraper would also be one of the tallest on the New York skyline. Architecture firm Oiio concepted this design, which almost looks like an eloganted, habitable St. Louis Arch. Regardless if it ends up breaking ground or not, it’s nice to see concepts that bend the mind just a bit. Via DesignBoom:

Big Bend Skyscraper Big Bend Skyscraper Big Bend Skyscraper

Though it does share some resemblance to the beautifully animated The Book of Life, Pixar’s take on Mexican culture and the Day of the Dead looks to be a visually enchanting ride. Take a look at the trailer for their new film coming this October, Coco.

Pixar's new film, Coco Pixar's new film, Coco

 

A CNC machine is not elegant. It’s huge and cumbersome, with wires cords and complicated settings. But the output of a CNC can be beautiful. Take these bird sculptures, for example. Created by Moisés Hernández Design Studio, the simplified bird forms are made smooth and streamlined, and then color dipped for a very soft and warm effect.

CNC birds

tribespeople of Namibia

Photographer Ben Moore has a really pretty collection of images from Namibia of some of the tribal people that call it home.

tribespeople of Namibia tribespeople of Namibia tribespeople of Namibia tribespeople of Namibia

viking village

Between Höfn and Djúpivogur in rural Iceland lies a Viking village. Well, a beautiful replica of a Viking village, that is. Built in 2010 for a film that never happened, the replica set is beautiful desolate and abandoned. Due to funding issues, the set was never used, though that might change in the next few years, as interest in Viking history grows. Photographer Jan Erik Waider has a beautifully stoic collection of images from the set, which looks as if it’s been there for hundreds of years. Iceland just never stops amazing us. Via Behance:


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Turkish artist Aydın Büyüktaş has a series of photos out called Flatland II that will really warp your brain. Taken of landscapes in the United States, Büyüktaş painstakingly stitches images together and then wraps their angles until they resemble roller coaster like twists. His work is fun and mesmerizing, and definitely puts a new perspective on familiar subject matter. Via DesignBoom:

mouse placenta imagery

The Placenta Rainbow highlights differences in mouse placental development that can result from manipulation of the mother’s immune system. These placentas were investigated at day 12 of the 20-day gestation period – the point at which a mouse’s placenta has gained its characteristic shape but is still developing.

The Wellcome Image Awards recognizes beauty and achievement in scientific photography. Their subject matter differs, but all of the winning images share one thing in common: a love and appreciation for science, and it’s inherent visual beauty. Here are a selection of unique and wonderful picks, with subject matter ranging from cat skin to mouse placentas. All captions from the Wellcome Image Awards.

A polarised light micrograph of a section of cat skin, showing hairs, whiskers and their blood supply. This sample is from a Victorian microscope slide. Blood vessels were injected with a red dye called carmine dye (here appearing black) in order to visualise the capillaries in the tissue, a newly developed technique at the time.

 

Native to the Pacific Ocean, Hawaiian bobtail squid are nocturnal predators that remain buried under the sand during the day and come out to hunt for shrimp near coral reefs at night. The squid have a light organ on their underside that houses a colony of glowing bacteria called Vibrio fischeri. The squid provide food and shelter for these bacteria in return for their bioluminescence.

 

This image shows a 3D reconstruction of an African grey parrot, post euthanasia. The 3D model details the highly intricate system of blood vessels in the head and neck of the bird and was made possible through the use of a new research contrast agent called BriteVu (invented by Scott Echols). This contrast agent allows researchers to study a subject’s vascular system in incredible detail, right down to the capillary level.

 

Short genetic sequences called microRNAs, which control the proper function and growth of cells, are being investigated by researchers as a possible cancer therapy. However, their potential use is limited by the lack of an efficient system to deliver these microRNAs specifically to cancerous cells. Researchers at MIT have developed such a system, combining two microRNAs with a synthetic polymer to form a stable woven structure a bit like a net. This synthetic net can coat a tumour and deliver the two microRNAs locally to cancer cells.

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