// Beauty // Design // Smart Ideas.

Posts from the ‘Documentary Film’ category

Mars imagery taken by NASA HiRise Cameras

From the cold of space, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has quietly been snapping pictures of Mars for the last 12 years. Using a camera system called HiRise, it’s been mapping and taking detailed stills of the Mars surface. Now, a Finnish filmmaker named Jan Fröjdman has taken those stills and very painstakingly stitched them together into a beautiful video. The result is stunning, a serene yet unfamiliar flyover of magnificent landscapes that are as varied as they are beautiful. Mars, we’re coming for you. This takes us one step closer. We highly recommend you watch this fullscreen, with the resolution turned up to 2K. Via Gizmodo:

Mars imagery taken by NASA HiRise Cameras Mars imagery taken by NASA HiRise Cameras Mars imagery taken by NASA HiRise Cameras Mars imagery taken by NASA HiRise Cameras

Advertisements

Cascine Moss and Fog

Design Studio PESI has a great new light series called Cascine, made from acrylic and steel, with colored LEDs that can be manipulated to overlap each other in beautifully colored hues. Click the images below to see the different style lamps up close. Great use of simple color and form. Via Behance:

feral children of the world

Sujit Kumar (the chicken boy), Fiji, 1978
Kept in a chicken coop by his family until the age of 8, Sujit Kumar clucked, pecked at food, and roosted like a bird

The stories behind the photographs aren’t pretty. They’re weird, terrifying, and often disturbing. But photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten does a great job creating beautifully lit scenes to pay homage to these strange stories. Like Sujit Jumar, trapped in a chicken coop for so long, he pecked like a chicken and ‘roosted’ at night. Descriptions and images via DesignBoom:

feral children of the world

Lobo wolf girl, Mexico, 1845/1852
Seen in Mexico running on all fours with a pack of wolves, attacking a herd of goats

 

feral children of the world

Prava (the bird boy), Russia, 2008
confined to a room containing dozens of his mother’s pet birds, Prava could not speak when found, only chirp

 

 

 

feral children of the world

Kamala and Amala, India, 1920
aged 8 and 1 respectively, the pair were found living in a cave with wolves
running on all fours, the pair were physically deformed and had exceptional hearing, sight and sense of smell

Continue reading…

1 Comment

viking village

Between Höfn and Djúpivogur in rural Iceland lies a Viking village. Well, a beautiful replica of a Viking village, that is. Built in 2010 for a film that never happened, the replica set is beautiful desolate and abandoned. Due to funding issues, the set was never used, though that might change in the next few years, as interest in Viking history grows. Photographer Jan Erik Waider has a beautifully stoic collection of images from the set, which looks as if it’s been there for hundreds of years. Iceland just never stops amazing us. Via Behance:


Continue reading…

Antelope Canyon is world renowned for its undulating, curvaceous beauty, and the way light turns the sandstone walls into colorful canvasses. Photographer Doran Hannes does it amazing justice with his collection, Antelope Canyon – A Case Study. Via Behance:

mouse placenta imagery

The Placenta Rainbow highlights differences in mouse placental development that can result from manipulation of the mother’s immune system. These placentas were investigated at day 12 of the 20-day gestation period – the point at which a mouse’s placenta has gained its characteristic shape but is still developing.

The Wellcome Image Awards recognizes beauty and achievement in scientific photography. Their subject matter differs, but all of the winning images share one thing in common: a love and appreciation for science, and it’s inherent visual beauty. Here are a selection of unique and wonderful picks, with subject matter ranging from cat skin to mouse placentas. All captions from the Wellcome Image Awards.

A polarised light micrograph of a section of cat skin, showing hairs, whiskers and their blood supply. This sample is from a Victorian microscope slide. Blood vessels were injected with a red dye called carmine dye (here appearing black) in order to visualise the capillaries in the tissue, a newly developed technique at the time.

 

Native to the Pacific Ocean, Hawaiian bobtail squid are nocturnal predators that remain buried under the sand during the day and come out to hunt for shrimp near coral reefs at night. The squid have a light organ on their underside that houses a colony of glowing bacteria called Vibrio fischeri. The squid provide food and shelter for these bacteria in return for their bioluminescence.

 

This image shows a 3D reconstruction of an African grey parrot, post euthanasia. The 3D model details the highly intricate system of blood vessels in the head and neck of the bird and was made possible through the use of a new research contrast agent called BriteVu (invented by Scott Echols). This contrast agent allows researchers to study a subject’s vascular system in incredible detail, right down to the capillary level.

 

Short genetic sequences called microRNAs, which control the proper function and growth of cells, are being investigated by researchers as a possible cancer therapy. However, their potential use is limited by the lack of an efficient system to deliver these microRNAs specifically to cancerous cells. Researchers at MIT have developed such a system, combining two microRNAs with a synthetic polymer to form a stable woven structure a bit like a net. This synthetic net can coat a tumour and deliver the two microRNAs locally to cancer cells.

1 Comment

Astronomy Picture of the Day has a remarkable shot of a crater lake reflecting the gorgeous aurora above it. Learn much more about the photo and the stars contained in it on their website.

 

 

jennifer-bolande-desert-x-moss-and-fog

When we say reflective, we mean the quiet, contemplative kind. Artist Jennifer Boland’s installations are part of Desert X, a sprawling art exhibit being held in the American Southwest.

In displaying the actual mountainous backdrop on these large digital billboards, Boland forces the casual driver to make a connection between the physical and the two dimensional. Indeed, the images are aligned in a way that from a certain angle, the billboards align perfectly to the mountains behind them. Desert X is happening February 25 – April 30.  Via DesignBoom: 

jennifer-bolande-desert-x-moss-and-fog-2jennifer-bolande-desert-x-moss-and-fog-3jennifer-bolande-desert-x-moss-and-fog-4jennifer-bolande-desert-x-moss-and-fog-5

dn34exozifhjs58b9axn

NOAA’s 2017 American Samoa Expedition has discovered some amazing deep sea creatures, many of whom defy explanation and description. Their finds underscore just how critical science is to our society.  The Venus Flytrap sea anemone?! Or how about this incredible Armored Searobin. Our planet never ceases to amaze, and in 2017, it’s truly remarkable that we’re still discovering new and fascinating species.  Via Gizmodo:

2017 American Samoa roih1boncgd3utcisss1 tcytvz2njz0kcolfv8vh

invisibleoregon-mossandfog1

This is just Wow. As an Oregonian, I’m very proud of my state. It’s people and politics and nature all add up to something special. But I’ve never seen the Beaver state like this, and I bet you haven’t either. Made using infrared converted cameras, Sam Forencich has created a masterpiece of scenery and landscape. Beautifully shot using drones and time lapse, the scenery looks completely otherworldly thanks to the way infrared lights things up. Mount Hood comes alive with colors you’ve never seen. Crater Lake looks like an alien landscape from a science fiction movie. Edited with brilliantly choreographed sound design, this is a fullscreen, sound-on affair. Do yourself a favor and devote 5 minutes fully to this video, entitled Invisible Oregon. It’s amazing. Via LaughingSquid:

invisibleoregon-mossandfog2 invisibleoregon-mossandfog3 invisibleoregon-mossandfog4 invisibleoregone-mossandfog5

%d bloggers like this: